Storks movie poster
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Storks
Storks movie poster

Storks Movie Review

Now available on Blu-ray and DVD (Buy on Amazon)

Largely flightless but not without its sputtering moments, Storks is a harmless cartoon that may appeal to little kids but won’t deliver to parents. Inconsistently funny but instantly forgettable, it’s best not to tell your children how this baby came to be.

About a stork who used to deliver babies to needy parents but now operates as part of an Amazon clone’s drone delivery service—and a human girl who was for some reason raised by storks—Storks plays off a decent concept but does little to separate itself from other, better animated fare.

The movie’s highlights come in short bursts, thanks primarily to manic, off-the-wall moments. Storks succeeds when it’s being especially weird and nonsensical, when writer and co-director Nicholas Stoller apparently got frustrated with the blandness of his film’s overall story, knocked a few beers back, snorted a few lines and put whatever came into his mind to paper, and onto the screen.

And some of those best, alcohol-binged sequences involve an idiotic, douchebag pigeon. No joke.

Sadly, those moments don’t come frequently enough and feel more like exceptions than rules. The first third of this thankfully short affair is dreadfully dull, as if Stoller set out to challenge you to pay attention. Storks recovers some as the story finally kicks into gear, putting its two utterly forgettable leads into an adventure full of weird wolves (a highlight) and a bunch of other situations that, only 12 hours after watching the movie, I’ve already forgotten.

Storks has its funny moments, but telling your kids about how babies are actually made is going to be more enjoyable than sitting through this stinker.

Review by Erik Samdahl unless otherwise indicated.

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