Weather Girl movie poster
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Weather Girl movie poster

Weather Girl Movie Review

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If there's one thing that people think they know about Seattle, it's the weather. That's probably why the rare film to be set in Seattle often includes something having to do with the weather, the latest being Weather Girl, a smart, funny and believable romantic comedy that is, unfortunately, not receiving a wide release.

Weather Girl begins with a delicious scene where weather woman Sylvia, played by Tricia O'Kelley, goes on the air, but instead of talking about the sun and rain she decides to lay into her boyfriend (Mark Harmon) and his co-anchor about having an affair together. She proceeds to quit and immediately becomes a huge YouTube sensation. Flustered, she moves in with her younger brother (Ryan Devlin) and meets his annoying friend Byron (Patrick J. Adams), who soon becomes her friend-with-benefits Byron. As her life seems to be course correcting itself, Byron finds himself falling in love with her while she learns that the public - and her former employer - has fallen in love with her as well - or at least some version of her.

As a Seattleite, I am always pleased when a movie is set here. Hell, everyone in the area is pleased, because it's such a rare occurrence for us to be given the time of day. It's even rarer for a production to get it right, or at least put some sincere effort into it. Sure, when I need to brood I don't drive all the way out to Alkai Point as the characters do in this film, but there is enough Seattle stuff to make it feel halfway legit - even though it was filmed in Los Angeles.

For the rest of you, though, Weather Girl is a good movie on its own accord. It's fast-paced, well-written, well-acted and entertaining, with a good number of funny scenes. More important, it feels like an authentic story, something that could happen in real life. The chemistry between O'Kelley and Adams - and Devlin, for that matter - is strong, and their exchanges work no matter what the scene calls for. Sometimes they're going for laughs, sometimes for drama, and sometimes just for good romance, but the threesome look and feel like they could be a brother, sister and best friend.

Weather Girl really doesn't have any faults, other than it doesn't capitalize on the fact that Seattle has notoriously unpredictable weather. Maybe it'd be too much of an inside joke, but it's a shame that a film about a Seattle weather forecaster doesn't capitalize on something that everyone in Seattle knows. Oh well.

It's not hilarious, and the plot is pretty simple, but then again, it doesn't need to be anything more. There's no gimmick or plot devices here, just a good old romantic comedy that doesn't feel like the typical, fluffy romantic comedy. O'Kelley is great in the lead, and Harmon plays the love-to-hate-him ex-boyfriend oh so well.

If Weather Girl does come to a theater near you, check it out (strangely, it isn't even playing in Seattle, where it could actually make some money). If not, add it to your Netflix list before you forget.

Review by Erik Samdahl unless otherwise indicated.

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