Pig movie poster
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Pig
Pig movie poster

Pig Movie Review

In Pig, a haggard Nicolas Cage goes on a mission through the ruthless culinary underworld of Portland to track down his pignapped truffle pig, but if you’re expecting a whacky, Cage-rattling revenge thriller a la John Wick--I sure was--think again.

Pig is an odd, offbeat, and alluringly sublime exploration of grief, or recovery, or something. Unpredictable and committed to committing to nothing, Michael Sarnoski’s drama-thriller is more drama than thriller, a rambling journey that shimmies between grounded sentiment and otherworldly splendor, for better or for worse.

Look to Rotten Tomatoes you’ll find piles of bacon-savoring critics rolling in the mud to lap praise on this off kilter, seeking to explain the various evolutions the film and Cage’s character--Rob--goes through as he steps out from his reclusive shack into the wood and back into society (or some form of society). The analysis is sound and compelling.

But Pig is a movie more deserving of respect than praise; while I appreciate what Sarnoski has created and the directorial tone of the production, and as much it’s nice to see Cage reign in the craziness for a couple hours and deliver a somewhat mesmerizing performance, I tuned out rather early and even the smell of bacon couldn’t keep me interested.

Pig is no John Wick, which is fine, but I sure as hell was hoping to be. The movie is sort of dull and certainly a bit aimless. Its strength is its willingness to defy the rules, but it frustratingly refuses to fully come together in a satisfying way. This approach is clearly winning over the cinephiles among us, but for regular moviegoers, Pig is a bit hamfisted.

Review by Erik Samdahl unless otherwise indicated.

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